Transparency Report about Government Requests for Member Data: First Half of 2017

LinkedIn’s transparency report was updated today to include government requests for member data from the first half of 2017. For the sixth consecutive reporting period, there was an increase in both the number of requests received (207), and in the number of accounts subject to those requests (614), a trend we continue to watch closely. We are committed to maintaining an open and honest dialogue with our members, and the general public, by providing visibility into how and when governments ask...

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Transparency Report about Government Requests for Member Data: Second Half of 2016

Today we’re releasing the latest Transparency Report numbers. The new report reflects the number of government requests for member data that LinkedIn processed from July through December of 2016. The number of requests received is relatively flat compared to the prior reporting period (145 total requests worldwide in the first half of 2016, versus 150 for the second half of the year). However, there continues to be a noticeable uptick in the number of accounts affected, on average, by an...

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Updates to Our Terms of Service

At LinkedIn, our “members first” philosophy helps guide every decision we make, including how we gather and respect your personal information. Today, we’re giving you an early look at LinkedIn’s updated Terms of Service - our Privacy Policy and User Agreement - so that you can understand what’s changing before it takes effect on June 7, 2017. It’s been a little while since we updated our Terms of Service and we’ve taken this opportunity to shorten and reorganize our Privacy Policy to make it...

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Updates to Our Cookie Policy

At LinkedIn, we believe in being clear and open about how we collect and use data related to you. We have updated our cookie policy and, in the spirit of transparency, want to share some information about the changes. Our policy provides detailed information about how and when we use cookies, which applies to any LinkedIn product or service that links to this policy or incorporates it by reference.

We use cookies and other technologies to ensure everyone who uses LinkedIn has the best possible experience. Cookies also help us keep your account safe. For example, cookies enable us to identify your device, secure your access to LinkedIn and our sites generally, and even help us know if someone attempts to access your account from a different device. Cookies also enable you to easily share content on LinkedIn and help us serve relevant ads to you. They allow us to bring you advertising both on and off the LinkedIn sites, and bring customized features to you through LinkedIn plugins such as our "Share" button. To find out more about cookies, including how to see what cookies have been set and how to manage and delete them, visit wikipedia.org, www.allaboutcookies.org, or www.aboutcookies.org.

We want to make sure that you have complete awareness of how our policy works and offer additional ways to opt-out. Soon, if you are a LinkedIn member but log out of your account on a browser, LinkedIn may still continue to log your interaction with our services on that browser for up to 30 days in order to generate usage analytics for our services, which we may share in aggregate, de-identified form with our advertising customers.You can opt-out of off-site and third-party-informed advertising by adjusting your settings. Please note that opting out will not remove advertising from the pages you visit; it will mean that the ads you see may not be matched to your interests. We do not provide any personal information that we collect to advertisers. If you are not a LinkedIn member, learn more about cookies and how to opt out. Most browsers also provide functionality that lets you review and erase cookies, including LinkedIn cookies. Check out the updated our cookie table within the policy to share the categories and descriptions of the cookies we use.

As always, we will continue to be transparent about any changes that we make to our policy. The privacy and security of our members is our number one priority and we are committed to keeping our services secure and safe.

LinkedIn’s Transparency Report about Government Requests for Member Data: Second Half of 2015

Today we are releasing our Transparency Report, which covers government requests for data received from July through December of 2015. You can read the full report here.

We publish this report twice a year as part of LinkedIn’s ongoing transparency commitment to our members. Since the publication of our first transparency report in 2011, we have sought to provide our members with information about the law enforcement requests we receive for member data and our responses to those requests.

The portion of our member base impacted by law enforcement requests has been relatively constant. In this Transparency Report, we see an uptick in the total number of requests received (we received 134 requests in the second half of 2015, 112 requests in the first half of 2015 and 100 requests in the second half of 2014). Overall, this was the highest number of requests for member data LinkedIn has received during a six-month window, with the greatest increase coming from requests originating in the United States. This overall increase is not unique to LinkedIn, and is similar to other online services.

LinkedIn complies with properly served legal requests for member information from law enforcement agencies. When we do so, we scrutinize each and every request we receive, notify each affected member whenever the law permits, and work to ensure that requests for our members’ information are not overly broad and are consistent with internationally recognized human rights laws and standards. We also continue to engage in public policy advocacy to protect our members’ data. For example, we oppose all forced backdoor access to our members’ data and continue to participate in issues affecting our broader community. Particularly relevant today, we filed an amicus brief in support of Apple in their ongoing dispute with the FBI over developing a compelled workaround to Apple’s encryption software.

LinkedIn’s Transparency Report about Government Requests for Member Data: Second Half of 2015

Today we are releasing our Transparency Report, which covers government requests for data received by LinkedIn companies from July through December of 2015. You can read the full report here .

We publish this report twice a year as part of LinkedIn’s ongoing transparency commitment to our members. Since the publication of our first transparency report in 2011, we have sought to provide our members with information about the law enforcement requests we receive for member data and our responses to those requests.

The portion of our member base impacted by law enforcement requests has been relatively constant. In this Transparency Report, we see an uptick in the total number of requests received (we received 134 requests in the second half of 2015, 112 requests in the first half of 2015 and 100 requests in the second half of 2014). Overall, this was the highest number of requests for member data LinkedIn has received during a six-month window, with the greatest increase coming from requests originating in the United States. This overall increase is not unique to LinkedIn, and is similar to other online services.

LinkedIn complies with properly served legal requests for member information from law enforcement agencies. When we do so, we scrutinize each and every request we receive, notify each affected member whenever the law permits, and work to ensure that requests for our members' information are not overly broad and are consistent with internationally recognized human rights laws and standards. We also continue to engage in public policy advocacy to protect our members' data. For example, we oppose all forced backdoor access to our members' data and continue to participate in issues affecting our broader community. Particularly relevant today, we filed an amicus brief in support of Apple in their ongoing dispute with the FBI over developing a compelled workaround to Apple's encryption software.

Managing Your Settings on LinkedIn is Now Easier Than Ever

Providing you with clarity and control when it comes to your experience on LinkedIn is a crucial part of our Members First philosophy. Today we’re excited to share that we are making “Privacy & Settings” even more convenient for you, with a streamlined hub to help you easily manage your LinkedIn account. It’s important to note that no settings have been taken away and no default or preferences have been changed - we’ve made sure all settings are in place and are easier to control.  

What’s New

When you visit the new “Privacy & Settings” page, you’ll see we’ve redesigned the entire experience, starting with quick details about your account at the top and all settings categorized into three groups: Account, Privacy and Communications.

  • Account includes things like adding email addresses, changing your password or language, and exporting your data.
  • Privacy covers all privacy and security settings related to what can be seen about you, what information can be used, and making sure your account stays secure with a second factor of authentication.
  • Communications houses your preferences for how LinkedIn and other members are able to contact you, and how frequently you’d like to hear from us.

LinkedIn_desktop_settings_view

We know that members enjoy connecting with colleagues and acquaintances in their networks. To make connecting easier, if a member has your email address or phone number in the contacts they upload to LinkedIn, we may suggest they connect with you. W e’ve added new settings options that let you choose who can see you as a suggested connection when they have your contact info. As always, it's up to you to decide how you want to grow your network, and which invitations you want to accept.

Linkedin desktop settings example

We’ll be rolling out this new experience to all members in the next few weeks. In the meantime, be sure to turn on two-step verification for added security and add a backup phone number so you never get locked out of your account.

Managing Your Settings on LinkedIn is Now Easier Than Ever

Providing you with clarity and control when it comes to your experience on LinkedIn is a crucial part of our Members First philosophy. Today we’re excited to share that we are making “Privacy & Settings” even more convenient for you, with a streamlined hub to help you easily manage your LinkedIn account. It’s important to note that no settings have been taken away and no default or preferences have been changed – we’ve made sure all settings are in place and are easier to control.  

What’s New

When you visit the new “Privacy & Settings” page, you’ll see we’ve redesigned the entire experience, starting with quick details about your account at the top and all settings categorized into three groups: Account, Privacy and Communications.

  • Account includes things like adding email addresses, changing your password or language, and exporting your data.
  • Privacy covers all privacy and security settings related to what can be seen about you, what information can be used, and making sure your account stays secure with a second factor of authentication.
  • Communications houses your preferences for how LinkedIn and other members are able to contact you, and how frequently you’d like to hear from us.

LinkedIn_desktop_settings_view

We know that members enjoy connecting with colleagues and acquaintances in their networks. To make connecting easier, if a member has your email address or phone number in the contacts they upload to LinkedIn, we may suggest they connect with you. We’ve added new settings options that let you choose who can see you as a suggested connection when they have your contact info. As always, it’s up to you to decide how you want to grow your network, and which invitations you want to accept.

Linkedin desktop settings example

We’ll be rolling out this new experience to all members in the next few weeks. In the meantime, be sure to turn on two-step verification for added security and add a backup phone number so you never get locked out of your account.

LinkedIn’s Transparency Report about Government Requests for Member Data: First Half of 2015

At LinkedIn, our members are our top priority. This powers all of the decisions we make including being open and honest, especially when it comes to your data. Today we’ve published the latest installment of LinkedIn’s Transparency Report, summarizing government requests for member account data we received from January through June 2015. We publish this report twice a year to keep members informed of how often law enforcement and other government officials serve LinkedIn with subpoenas or court orders for member data, and how LinkedIn responds to such data requests.

Report preview: We received 112 requests from 7 countries (Bulgaria, Canada, France, India, Spain, UK and the U.S.) in this reporting period, seeking information pertaining to 161 member accounts. That reflects a small increase over the 100 requests received in the prior reporting period.

While government data requests reach only a tiny proportion of our 380M member base, we take each request seriously—pushing back if it’s defective or overbroad, and notifying each affected member whenever the law permits. In addition to reviewing each request, we have been pushing for reforms in the processes governments use to request member data. Read more about LinkedIn’s efforts in the Report.