Please Take the Time to Do This Important LinkedIn Function

Are you taking enough time to evaluate and respond to your inbound requests to connect on LinkedIn?

I'm guessing probably not.

During the fifty or so one-on-one LinkedIn consultations I've done over the past few months, I learned that most people have a just-get-it-done attitude when it comes to responding to invitations to connect. Well, personal experience has taught me that a thoughtful, personal response will many times open the elusive door to opportunity, and here are some simple ways you can capitalize on these invitations.
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Attitude is everything

Most people who invite you to join their network are hoping to build on a relationship you already have or start a new relationship that will be mutually beneficial.

Granted—there will be spammers or people who do not have your best interests in mind. That's one of social media's unavoidable challenges. But simply click Ignore and get rid of them as fast as you can.

Now, some people won't take the time to explain why they want to connect with you—and others won't even know how to send a personalized note. But if you start with the premise that these people could be referrals from your longtime clients and not simply people who just want to sell you something, it will be easier to spend a few extra minutes considering whether they'll be a good addition to your network.
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How to uncover potential opportunities

Rather than addressing your inbound invitations while you're standing in the grocery checkout line, set aside some time to devote to this task. Then open the entire list by clicking Network in your top toolbar and choosing Manage all. Then evaluate each invitation as follows:

If you know the person well and interact with them often, click the Accept button and, at a minimum, send a message back to thank them for initiating the invitation and express your desire to help each other in the future.

If the person or the company they represent sounds somewhat familiar to you, go directly to their profile and see what information you can gather.
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  • How do they describe themselves in their Headline and Summary?
  • How many connections do they have and how complete is their profile?
  • How many and who are your mutual connections?
  • What responsibility do they have in their current job and where did they work in the past?
  • What are they sharing and writing? (View their Articles and Activity)
  • Where and when did they go to school?
  • What accomplishments do they display?

This information should help clarify whether they would be a good addition to your network.

If you choose to accept them, I challenge you to send a follow-up thank-you message. This simple, kind gesture will be the first step toward growing this relationship into one that will produce results.

It can also be advantageous to offer something of value in your note, like a helpful resource or an invitation to an upcoming event. You can either attach the information or provide a link to it.

Another simple way to add immediate value to this relationship is to introduce them to people in your network who could help them in some way—and hopefully the introduction will be beneficial for both parties.

If you'd like to take it a step further, suggest a follow-up phone call or meeting. I use Calendly, a calendar sharing tool that makes it easy to book an appointment with me.

If neither the person nor the company they represent is familiar to you, don't hastily click Ignore but instead follow the same vetting steps mentioned above. You may just find some gold in them thar hills.

They took the time to send you an invitation and undoubtedly have a reason for wanting you to join their network. If you'd like to uncover the reason, you can send them a message before accepting the invitation by clicking Message below their entry on the Manage Invitations page.

Spend the extra time, and soon those relationships will bring new opportunities you would have missed if you had hurried through your inbound invitations.
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SPECIAL OFFER

For more simple strategies to improve your LinkedIn ROI, along with a detailed critique of your profile, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one phone consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). 

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

The post Please Take the Time to Do This Important LinkedIn Function appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Trust Me, You’ll Love This New LinkedIn Feature

Great news!

Cheerful smiling young man with tabletSearching through one of your LinkedIn connection's network to find a certain type of person just got much easier—and this applies to you whether you have a free account or you're paying to use LinkedIn.

If you're like me, you really appreciate receiving referrals from people in your network, but it's not easy to ask the open-ended question,"Who in your network could help me find a job, customer, etc.?"

And rather than putting all the pressure on your connection to come up with the right people, why not use LinkedIn's newest feature to find the right people all by yourself.
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How to search your connection's network

Follow these simple steps, and you'll quickly discover who might be able to help you achieve your goal.

Put your cursor in the big, white search box in the top toolbar and select Screen Shot 2017-07-03 at 2.31.52 PMSearch for people with filters from the drop-down menu.

On the right side of your screen, under Filter people by, go to the Connections of box and type in your connection's name. When his/her name appears in the drop-down menu, click that entry.

Then use any of the other available filters to narrow the search to people at the right company, location, school attended, title, etc.

Review the list that LinkedIn provides for you. If you find people who look interesting to you, check out their profile, and then ask your connection how best to approach the people (through a LinkedIn connection request, phone call, email, in-person meeting, etc.)

Screen Shot 2017-08-16 at 11.42.42 AMCaveat: If your connection has chosen to hide his/her first-level network from his connections, you'll only be able to see people to whom both of you are connected.  

Here's an example of how my search filters would look if I wanted to find out whether my connection Bob Hill knows any presidents or CEOs in the marketing and advertising industry in the Milwaukee area.

I know you'll be as excited as I was to see that LinkedIn has brought back this feature, and your network will appreciate the homework you do before asking for a referral.

If you'd like me to show you other hard-to-find, "can't miss" LinkedIn features, help you formulate your personal LinkedIn strategy, plus provide an in-depth critique of your LinkedIn profile, sign up for a one-hour, one-on-one consultation with me for the significantly reduced rate of $175. (This is a limited-time offer.)

Book your personal session today at https://calendly.com/waynebreitbarth/special1on1linkedinconsult.

The post Trust Me, You’ll Love This New LinkedIn Feature appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Do You Look Like an Expert on LinkedIn or Just a Bragger?

A few years back my mom said, I thought I taught you that bragging is not nice! I Screen Shot 2017-08-04 at 4.48.22 PMlooked at your LinkedIn thing, and you're tooting your horn all over the place.

Well, there definitely is a fine line between being real and authentic on your LinkedIn profile and appearing boastful or pretentious. However, it's extremely important to clearly show people why you are expert at what you do and share valuable information with your network.

As a guy who looks at probably a hundred profiles each week, I can definitively tell you that most people are not displaying and sharing enough information, and this puts them at a distinct disadvantage when someone is comparing them to others in the same or similar position.

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Best ways to use LinkedIn to display and share your expertise

If you need to beef up your profile and boost your presence on LinkedIn, here are seven simple ways to accomplish that without getting scolded by your mom.

1.  Recommendations. It does take time to secure recommendations, but it will be worth the effort, because nothing is better than someone else saying you're the best. It will differentiate you from others when people are comparing you to your competitors, and you'll undoubtedly receive lots of positive comments about the quality of your recommendations—which should lead to new business.

2.  Skills and related endorsements. Even though this feature has caused a lot of confusion (and rightly so), it still has great value. You can display what you're expert at, and, if done correctly, it will help you get to the top of the list when people are looking for your products, services, and expertise.

Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.19.58 AM3.  Adding media (available in the Summary, Experience and Education sections of your profile). These are great places to display or link to documents (Word, Excel and pdf), video, Power Point presentations, blog entries, and photos that allow the readers to see for themselves the depth of your expertise.

4. Separate job experience entry for industry leadership position. If you hold or have held an office or position in an industry related association or organization, highlight that fact by adding an additional current or past job experience entry to your profile. Share specific details about your responsibilities. Also, if you're a speaker at your association's events or a contributor to their newsletter or blog, share that as well.

Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.21.43 AM5.  Accomplishments profile sections. Don't be bashful about adding these special profile sections and including details related to each entry. Remember—you're the only one who is going to tell your story. Also, if you don't list any accomplishments on your profile, people may assume you don't have any accomplishments!

6.  Individual status updates. Because everyone in your network will not receive or read every status update you post, share your best resources regularly. This also gives Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.24.10 AMpeople who are new to your network an opportunity to see your best stuff.

7.  Publish an article. This is the newest way to share your thought leadership. It's like having your own blog, and your network is notified whenever you post an article. And because it stays on your profile, people will see your expertise on display whenever they visit your profile.

Don't let your competitors get an advantage over you on LinkedIn. Be real and authentic as you proudly display who you are and what you have to offer—and hopefully your mom will say, That's my awesome kid!

The post Do You Look Like an Expert on LinkedIn or Just a Bragger? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Are You Still Confused by LinkedIn Skills and Endorsements?

Happy 5th birthday, LinkedIn Skills!

Birthday cakeYes, it has been five years since LinkedIn Skills appeared on your profile and probably caused a bit of confusion for you. Then a few years later the confusion ramped up when endorsements started showing up alongside your skills. And because LinkedIn started asking its members to endorse their connections, people began endorsing others for everything and anything—even skills we never added to our profile.

And just when most of us started to understand and take control of this profile section, LinkedIn gave us a five-year "birthday present" as part of the new desktop layout—an updated profile section titled Featured Skills & Endorsements and what they call "skill endorsements." And I thought birthday parties were supposed to be fun!
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How to optimize your Featured Skills & Endorsements profile section

Let's raise the fun factor just a bit with these nine facts and tips to maximize your use of this new profile section.

1.  You can only receive endorsements from 1st level connections and for skills you have acknowledged you possess. If you receive Screen Shot 2017-05-10 at 2.31.40 PMa pending endorsement notification from LinkedIn saying, John Jones wants to endorse you for basket weaving, don't say yes if you aren't a good basket weaver or don't want basket weaving listed as a skill in your Featured Skills & Endorsements section.

2.  You can manage them to a certain extent. Scroll down to the Featured Skills & Endorsements section of your profile, and then you can:
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  • Add any skills that show what you're good at from a professional standpoint. If your job duties include sales, add keywords that relate to the products and services you sell. After you click Add a new skill, type a skill in the box. LinkedIn will then give you suggestions based on the words you put in the box. If those suggestions are part of your skill set, be sure to add them to your list of skills.
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  • Screen Shot 2017-05-10 at 2.33.26 PMDelete a skill. Click the pencil icon in the top right corner. Then click the "X" to the left of the skill you want to delete, and it's gone—along with any endorsements of that skill, of course.
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  • Reorder your skills so your most important ones are near the top. These are your best keywords, and they'll improve your search ranking. Put them in the order you prefer, from most important to least important, by clicking the pencil icon and then holding down and dragging the four-line icon to the right of the skill you want to reorder.
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    Then your connections will be encouraged to tick off endorsements for the skills you think are important, and within a short period of time they'll be the most endorsed skills on your profile. This will help you get closer to the top of a search for those critical skills.
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    The reordering process is especially important now because only the first three skills (LinkedIn refers to them as "featured") and the related endorsements show up until the reader clicks View XX more.
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  • Choose (1) whether or not you want to be endorsed, (2) whether you want LinkedIn to suggest endorsements to your connections, and (3) whether you want suggestions for endorsing your connections. Click Adjust endorsement settings on the bottom of the page to revise your settings.

3.  You can be endorsed for up to 50 skills. These skills are essentially keywords, and LinkedIn and other search engines love keywords; so I would use all 50 slots if I were you.

4.  You don't have to endorse everyone who endorses you. If you want to endorse them, go ahead, but don't feel obligated to do so.

5.  I'm pretty sure endorsements and the skills they attach to are part of the LinkedIn search algorithm. LinkedIn doesn't publicize its algorithm, but my guess is that skills are an important part of it, because LinkedIn doesn't invest this much time and effort into something that isn't going to help their top line revenue. They are making a lot of money on their Recruiting Solutions, and they obviously think this feature helps them deliver the "best" candidate for a certain skill ("best" meaning most endorsed).

6.  List skills that are important and consistent with your current or future business strategy. Because your skills that receive the most endorsements will be at the top of the list—and most people will probably only look at the first few skills—you want them to be your most important skills. If you list extraneous skills, you may get a lot of endorsements for them, and then no one will even notice your most important skills that are now further down on the list.

7.  You might get someone's attention if you endorse him/her. Your face and name will appear on the person's profile, and LinkedIn also sends the person a message saying you just endorsed him/her.

8.  Endorsements may be the differentiator. If two profiles look similar in all respects but one has 120 endorsements for the skill you're looking for and the other has only 20, you may be inclined to choose the person with 120.

9.  Endorsements are great, but LinkedIn recommendations are still important. I recommend you get at least two recommendations on your profile. This is especially important if you're a job seeker. Great recommendations will increase your credibility—and the more the better.

You should now be ready to impress readers of your profile with your specific skills and affirmation of those skills by LinkedIn members.

If you'd like more information about this topic, check out LinkedIn's complete discussion in the LinkedIn Help Center by clicking here.

The post Are You Still Confused by LinkedIn Skills and Endorsements? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How to Discover if You’re Really a LinkedIn All-Star

A pin being used to pop a green balloonCongratulations! You're an All-Star.

If you received this message from LinkedIn, well, I hate to burst your balloon, but an All-Star profile rating has very little to do with how successful you'll be on LinkedIn. And because of the significant profile changes that are part of the new desktop redesign, you need to rethink many of the profile strategies that have worked in the past.
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Be sure to check out my special, limited time offer below for 50% off a one-hour LinkedIn consultation that includes an in-depth profile critique.
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In my opinion, to have a truly exceptional LinkedIn profile that will help you accomplish your most ambitious business goals, you need to embrace these two important strategies:
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  • Capitalize on the LinkedIn search algorithm in order to come up higher in the search results
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  • Provide a very clear description of what you do, who you help, and why you are better than your competition

Each and every entry you make on your profile should be made with those two strategies in mind.


Simple ways to create an extraordinary LinkedIn profile

When I work with my individual and corporate clients to create LinkedIn profiles that get results, I focus on the following features and techniques:

Keywords. Include your most important keywords throughout your profile but especially in these three sections: Headline, Job Experience Titles, and Skills. This will significantly improve your placement in search results.

Headline. Make sure your Headline grabs your reader's attention and encourages him/her to read more.

First Job Experience entry. With the new profile layout, your first Current Job Experience entry is completely visible and doesn't require the reader to click See Description to view the details. This is your opportunity to make sure the reader gets a full picture of what you and your company do, the types of clients or customers you serve, and what makes you better than your competitors. Only the job title and company name are visible for all other Job Experience entries.

There are 2,000 available characters for each Job Experience entry, and you can also add media. So don't hesitate to "show and tell" the world why you're the best at what you do.

Other Job Experience entries. With the new profile layout, all the details of your other Job Experience entries are hidden, requiring the reader to click See Description to view any of the details you've outlined. Therefore, I highly recommend that you expand your Job Title entries. Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 8.13.40 AMThere is a 100-character limit, but that's ample space to give the reader a preview of what specific things you did in each job.

As an added bonus, any words you add to your Job Experience titles seem to have increased weighting in the search algorithm, thereby helping you move up on the list while improving the clarity of your story.

Recommendations. Two recommendations are given a very prominent position on your new profile, so work hard on getting a couple that really highlight your strengths and differentiate you from your competitors.

Remember—this is the only part of your profile that other people contribute, and readers will appreciate hearing about you and the great work you do from the perspective of others.

Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 4.07.18 PMAccomplishments. This one is simple—if you don't have anything listed in your Accomplishments sections, it looks like you didn't accomplish anything.

Subsections of the Accomplishments section include Honors and Awards, Test Scores, Publications, Projects, Certifications, Organizations, Languages, Courses, and Patents. Include any appropriate subsections and provide details that will inform readers of your unique and important accomplishments.

Contact Info. Add business-related contact information if you feel it's important for Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 8.18.12 AMreaders to get ahold of you without sending you a LinkedIn connection request. I recommend you include contact information in the beginning of your Summary and in your current Job Experience entry.

Once you complete these specific steps, I'm confident you'll stand out from the other players on the field, and you may just earn a spot on the real all-star team—the team that gets all the new business, secures the perfect jobs, and has the most effective relationships. Good luck!

Special Offer

If you'd like me to provide a detailed critique of your profile and help you develop a winning LinkedIn strategy, be sure to take advantage of my May special offer: A one-hour, one-on-one consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee).

This consultation will take place on the phone, and I will share my computer screen with you. There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book yours today by clicking here.

The post How to Discover if You’re Really a LinkedIn All-Star appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Create a Targeted Prospect List on the New LinkedIn in 5 Minutes or Less

Do you know that in five minutes the new LinkedIn can help you fill a virtual room with stopwatch time iconyour perfect prospects and then add new prospects each week?

And once you find them, their LinkedIn profiles will help you figure out the best way to meet them.

To quickly get your highly targeted prospect list, just follow these simple steps.

Let's say you want to find the current managers of purchasing, procurement, etc. at three of the largest manufacturers in Milwaukee: Generac, Rockwell Automation, and SC Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.53.50 PMJohnson.

1.  Enter manager + (purchasing OR procurement OR "supply chain" OR buyer) in the Search box on the left side of your top toolbar. Then click the magnifying glass next to the Search box.

2.  When the results are returned, click People from the choices on the line just below the top toolbar.Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.52.32 PM

3.  In the right-hand filter column, click the +Add icon in the Locations- section and type Milwaukee. Then choose Greater Milwaukee.

4.  Next, in the right-hand filter column, click +Add in the Current Companies section. Then type Generac and choose the Generac company entry that you're interested in. Repeat for Rockwell and SC Johnson.

You'll then see a list of your perfect prospects at those three companies on your screen. And if you click Create Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.53.05 PMsearch alert near the bottom of the right filter column, you'll get a weekly email from LinkedIn with any new prospects at those three companies.

For the people on this list, you can:
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  • Check out their full profiles and see who in your network can introduce you to them.
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  • Look for conversation starters; e.g., similar interests, previous employers, schools attended, LinkedIn groups, community service involvement, etc.
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  • Send a direct LinkedIn message if you and your prospect are both members of the same LinkedIn group. If you have no similar groups, consider joining one of your prospect's groups so you can send a free direct message.
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  • Send a customized LinkedIn connection invitation that includes information about how you might be able to help them.

No more cold calling and saying, May I speak with the purchasing manager, please. At a minimum, you'll have the name of your prospect. But if you use your LinkedIn resources well, you'll have a wealth of information about your prospect and perhaps even a personal introduction.

The post Create a Targeted Prospect List on the New LinkedIn in 5 Minutes or Less appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Do You Have This Important LinkedIn Setting Right?

One of the best LinkedIn features often overlooked for business development purposes is the People Also Similar looking businessmen in a rowViewed box, which is in the right column of your profile. This tells you who else people are looking at besides you—and it's probably people who have similar characteristics to you.

Now, LinkedIn doesn't share exactly how it works (other than this interview with a former LinkedIn employee), and you have no control over who appears on your profile. However, below I'll show you how you can take it off your profile if you don't want it there.
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Screen Shot 2017-02-02 at 7.27.15 AMHow to capitalize on this great prospecting tool

If you look at a client's or prospective client's profile and scroll down to People Also Viewed, the list could be a target list of people very similar to the person whose profile you are viewing.

I suggest you check this list out often on your clients' and prospective clients' profiles, and add some of these names to your master prospect list. And, hey, why not try to connect with the ones you are not connected with using a customized invitation to connect.  

Now, it's great to look at who's viewing other people's profiles, but you should decide whether you want People Also Viewed to show up on your profile. The default setting will put the list on your profile.

Personally, since I was tired of my competitors showing up on my profile, I unchecked the box. I feel pretty good about my decision because it doesn't stop me from seeing the People Also Viewed list on other people's profiles (unless they've also unchecked the box). And if my competitors haven't unchecked the box, I can still show up in the People Also Viewed list on their profiles.

It seems like a no-brainer to me. If you'd like to remove the People Also Viewed list from your profile, click here to learn how to change your setting.

Over time, if more and more people do what I'm suggesting, this feature will become less helpful. But, trust me, LinkedIn will probably change something before we get to that point. Take advantage of it while you can.

If you want to learn more simple ways to find new customers and grow your bottom line, sign up to attend one of my LinkedIn Extravaganza training workshops that are open to the public.

To get more details and check out the locations and dates, click here: http://www.powerformula.net/linkedin-training-seminars/

The post Do You Have This Important LinkedIn Setting Right? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Are you Annoying People with your LinkedIn Updates?

Do you share unprofessional, "Facebook-like" information on LinkedIn? I hear from people each and every week who are frustrated with the information people are sharing on LinkedIn. Entrepreneur angry and furious with laptop

So, what's the #1 LinkedIn rule of thumb relating to status updates that I wish everyone followed?

I call it the 6/3/1 Rule.

Simply put, for every ten status updates you share on LinkedIn (no matter over what time frame those posts take place), follow this rule:

Six should be great educational information for your intended audience that you didn't write. This is the stuff you've read from others that resonated with you in your area of expertise. It could be information (blogs, videos, LinkedIn posts and updates, etc.) from other noncompetitive experts in your industry associations or others you respect in your field or industry.

Screen Shot 2017-01-29 at 8.49.55 AMThree should be great educational information for your intended audience that you or your company authored or created. It could be blog posts, articles, videos, checklists, white papers, customer testimonials, "how to" information, product comparisons, or other research that you believe will help your audience.

One can be flat-out promotional, attempting to sell your goods or services.

If you follow this rule, you'll be sharing great customer-focused information 90% of the time and directly promoting only 10% of the time.

I work really hard to adhere to this rule out of respect for my network. (And, by the way, if you're not part of my network, you should be!) Then when my network sees a post about the newest edition of my book, my upcoming classes, or my LinkedIn consulting, they will probably say, This post doesn't bother me since most of the time Wayne shares great educational information about LinkedIn, and, after all, a guy's gotta make a living.

Using status updates correctly, no matter what social media site you're on, is one of the foundational principles screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-7-14-04-ameveryone needs to understand in order to be successful in the new digital marketing world—and the 6/3/1 Rule is particularly important on LinkedIn because it's meant to be a purely professional site.

If you want more concrete examples, I highly recommend Gary Vaynerchuk's book "Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World." He provides lots of specific examples of how to share social media updates correctly. Although he doesn't specifically mention LinkedIn, many of the concepts are applicable.

The post Are you Annoying People with your LinkedIn Updates? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How Will You Rank on the New LinkedIn?

Some people have told me they've received the new and improved(?) LinkedIn desktop interface. I personally don't have it yet, but I've been able to check out how it looks and works by looking over the shoulder of some of my friends who have it. Keywords searching concept with magnifying glass

I'm going to withhold my full, detailed review of the changes until I have it myself, but based on my review thus far, including your most important keywords on your profile continues to be a very important strategy. LinkedIn's search algorithm rewards you for including your critical keywords in multiple places and especially in particular spots—and who doesn't want to come up higher in the search rankings!

Follow these simple guidelines to improve your ranking on both the old and new desktop interfaces.
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What are your most important keywords?

Simply put, your keywords are the words that you think someone would use to search for you online, regardless of whether it's a general internet search site like Google, Bing, etc., a job search site like Career Builders or Monster, or a professional networking site like LinkedIn.

Depending on your objective for using LinkedIn, it could include words that describe you professionally, categories or brand names of the products and services you and your company provide, software you use proficiently, and so on.

My Keyword Worksheet (below) will help you identify the best words to include on your profile.
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Where should you put keywords on your LinkedIn profile?

The simple answer is everywhere you can—and the more times the better—but be sure your profile remains easy to read. Just listing a particular keyword over and over, with commas in between, will not only be hard to read but potentially confusing to the reader. In addition, LinkedIn has warned that this type of  "keyword stuffing" will not be tolerated—and you sure don't want them to penalize you by moving you down the search results list.

I've learned from working extensively with my LinkedIn clients over many years that there are three spots on your profile where you definitely want to include your most important keywords—your Headline, Job Experience Titles, and the Skills section.

To learn how to most effectively include keywords in these three sections, take a look at one of my client's profile—Scott Owens, managing director of BluTinuity, a firm specializing in business continuity and disaster recovery.
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Headline
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Experience Job Titles

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Skills

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Trust me on this one. Whether someone is searching with the old or new version of LinkedIn, if you follow this keyword strategy, you'll come up significantly higher in the search ranking, just like my client Scott Owens.

To identify your most important keywords, review or download my Keyword Worksheet below.

 

Download (PDF, 527KB)

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