Want to Know How to Plan a More Productive Trip Using LinkedIn?

It's summertime, and that usually means you hit the open road and do a bit of traveling. Whether it's travel for fun, work, or maybe a little of both, you want to make sure you get the best bang for your travel buck. For me, that means trying to spend time with as many important people as I can fit into my schedule.

LinkedIn has some great ways to help you find those potential candidates who just might make a big difference down the road.

So grab your itinerary, your map, your calendar, and your LinkedIn account, and let’s go searching.


Find your connections

Click your cursor in the big, white search box in your top toolbar. From the drop-down menu, choose Search for People. Then click the words All Filters in the white filters toolbar. Next, click the 1st box in the Connections filter and also enter the largest city you will be traveling to in the Locations box. When the city shows up in the drop-down menu, choose that entry. Then click the blue Apply button.

LinkedIn will display all of your first-level connections in that city or area. You can then message these people through LinkedIn and let them know you'd like to make a real, old-school connection with them on your upcoming trip.


Find your connections' connections

These are your second-level connections, and this step requires a little help in the form of an introduction from your friends (i.e., your first-degree connections). However, many times this introduction is exactly what makes the meeting so effective.

Follow the same steps as mentioned above, but this time click the 2nd box in the Connections filter. Before you click the blue Apply button, you may want to filter this list further by using the additional search filter boxes like TitleCurrent companies, Past companies, etc. This will help you find exactly the right people.

Once LinkedIn serves you up this list of “friends of friends,” look through the profiles and decide whom you want to meet. Then contact your shared connection and ask whether he/she will virtually introduce you to this person prior to your trip. Once you've been introduced, you're on your way to starting what will hopefully be a mutually beneficial relationship.


Find your classmates

Type the name of the school you attended in the white search box in the top toolbar. When you click the name of the school from the drop-down list of results, you'll be forwarded to the school's University page. Click the blue See Alumni button. Then go to the Where they live column and either click the name of the city you're visiting or type the name of the city in the search box that appears when you click the magnifying glass.

You can narrow the list even further if you filter by the company they work at, date of attendance, year of graduation, or what they do.


Find people at your targeted companies

In the white search box in the top toolbar, type the name of a company you're interested in. Choose that company from the drop-down results, and you'll be forwarded to their Company page.

If you click the See all XXX Employees on LinkedIn, you'll be forwarded to the Advanced People Search page, which is a listing of all the employees. Type the large cities you'll be visiting in the Locations filter box, and choose the city from the drop-down search results. LinkedIn will then display all the employees at the company who have LinkedIn accounts and live in that city. Feel free to use additional filters for titles, schools, etc.

After doing all this work, you may need to extend your trip a day or two!

Happy travels!

If you want to learn more LinkedIn strategies like these and also have your LinkedIn profile critiqued by me, then take advantage of my special one-hour, $175 LinkedIn consultation. This consultation will take place on the phone, and I'll share my desktop screen with you. I will email your marked-up profile to you prior to our session. This offer is only good until July 31, 2018. Click here to book your session.

Here are a few comments from my recent clients:

"Great job offer received via LinkedIn only two days after consulting with Wayne!"

"I highly recommend Wayne's 1:1 Linked In coaching session. Per Wayne's guidance, I reached out to the SVP of Client Success for a company I saw a suitable role. I used language Wayne provided in our 1:1 session to initiate the contact...Since then I've had an initial interview and interacted with the SVP multiple times."

"He made the learning experience fun, interesting, and was a big help to me. It has increased my exposure almost two-fold in a couple weeks."

Don't miss your chance to get results like these. Book your session now by clicking here. Space is limited and time is running out.

The post Want to Know How to Plan a More Productive Trip Using LinkedIn? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

What Does Your Social Proof Look Like on LinkedIn?

I'm pretty sure that sometime in the last week or so you checked the ratings of a specific product and/or researched what others said about something you wanted to purchase. What others are saying is called social proof.

Whether it's a hamburger, a computer, or even a new accountant, we are all looking for information (including social proof) to help us make our decisions.

Here's how Hubspot defines social proof:

Social proof, also referred to as "informational social influence," is the concept that people will conform to the actions of others under the assumption that those actions are reflective of the correct behavior. In other words, it's the mentality that, if other people are doing it, and I trust those people, that's validation that I should also be doing it. This third-party validation can be a very powerful motivator for your site visitors' and prospects' actions.  - Hubspot blog 4/17/12


How's Your Social Proof

Is your social proof helping or hurting you or is it simply absent on most of your online addresses (website, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.)? Do you have a 4.7/5.0 rating like your favorite restaurant on Yelp or Trip Advisor?

Even though it might not be quite as easy for you as an individual to accumulate a rating, there are specific things you can do to improve your social proof on LinkedIn.

I'm not just referring to the obvious LinkedIn sections—Recommendations and Skills and the Endorsements that attach to them. These are very important places to show social proof, but there are some other great ways to share positive ratings and reviews about you and your company.


Easy Ways to Share Your Social Proof

These LinkedIn profile sections and activities can help you highlight and share your social proof:

Add Media. There are lots of ways to use this add-on to your Summary, Job Experience or Educational sections. You can share video testimonials, traditional written customer recommendations, case studies, and success stories.

Projects. This is a good spot to include case studies or success stories, and you can link to web pages that include more details. You can also identify other LinkedIn members who were involved in a project and include a link to their LinkedIn profiles.

Individual or company status updates. Periodically share links in your status updates to case studies, success stories, and articles that highlight your capabilities.

Published Post. You can display a long-form article, including an embedded video. This is perfect for highlighting customer testimonials and case studies. These will permanently show up near the top of your profile.

Honors & Awards. If you've got them, flaunt them.

Current Job Experience section. Extract a short quote from a recommendation and highlight awards you've received.

Publications. Link to articles on your website or other sources that display your experience or awards and honors.

Certifications. These are great social proof because others (certifying organizations) are saying you met a certain level of proficiency.

So why not get busy and take advantage of these opportunities. It just may get you to that 4.7/5.0 score—or, better yet, how about a phone call or email from that sought-after prospect.

If you want me to check out the social proof on your profile as part of my full profile critique and also help you develop strategies to skyrocket your business and career, then take advantage of my special one-hour $175 LinkedIn consultation. This consultation will take place on the phone, and I'll share my desktop screen with you. I will email your marked-up profile to you prior to our session. Click here to book your session.

Here are a few comments from my recent clients:

"Great job offer received via LinkedIn only two days after consulting with Wayne!"

"I highly recommend Wayne's 1:1 Linked In coaching session. Per Wayne's guidance, I reached out to the SVP of Client Success for a company I saw a suitable role. I used language Wayne provided in our 1:1 session to initiate the contact...Since then I've had an initial interview and interacted with the SVP multiple times."

"He made the learning experience fun, interesting, and was a big help to me. It has increased my exposure almost two-fold in a couple weeks."

Don't miss your chance to get results like these. Book your session now by clicking here. Space is limited.

The post What Does Your Social Proof Look Like on LinkedIn? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Impress Your LinkedIn Network [and your mom] With Thank-You Notes

Making the right connections on LinkedIn is one of the keys to success. In the past I've written about who you should connect with, why you should connect with them, and how to best find great connections on LinkedIn.

But this week I want to reinforce something your mom taught you—writing thank-you notes.

It's time to dust off that time-proven technique—and not just because it's good etiquette but because it's good business, too.


When to send a thank-you note

Some people are adding dozens of people to their LinkedIn network each week, and sending a personal note to each person may not be possible. But, at the very least, I suggest sending a thank-you note when:

1.  You accept an inbound connection request from someone who meets one of your most important strategic connection criteria

2.  Someone accepts your outbound connection request

You have their attention; so don't miss this opportunity to send them a note. It may encourage them to give you a call or consider you next time they need whatever product or service you're offering.


They invited you to join their network

In this case, your response can be somewhat standard, but it may be advantageous to mention something the person said in his/her invitation to you.

Here's what I typically say:

Hi [insert first name]:

Thanks for the invitation to connect, and welcome to my network. 

I look forward to helping you with your LinkedIn strategy and tactics. To get started, let me know if you would like to begin receiving my free weekly email of LinkedIn strategies and tips. 

Take care. 

Wayne 


You invited them to join your network

In this case the note should be totally customized, depending on why you extended the invitation in the first place.

Say "thanks" and mention a next step the person could take. Here are a few easy ways to spark engagement:
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  • Include a link to download a helpful resource or an archived or upcoming webinar
  • Suggest a time for a phone call or meeting
  • Share a reason to check out a section of your website

You get the idea.

Does this take extra time? You bet. Will it be worth the effort? Without question. I add twenty to thirty people to my mailing list each week by following these steps—and some of them have become clients.

LinkedIn is so much more than a social media site you should check occasionally. It's a powerful tool to help you grow your business. And if you can make money AND make your mom proud, I say go for it!
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SPECIAL OFFER

If you’d like help with developing a LinkedIn strategy that will catapult your business and career, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one LinkedIn consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). This offer also includes an in-depth critique of your profile.

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked-up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

The post Impress Your LinkedIn Network [and your mom] With Thank-You Notes appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Is the LinkedIn Mobile App Helping You?

Because at most times you're probably closer to your mobile device than your desktop, it's important to understand the limitations and opportunities on the LinkedIn mobile app and adjust your LinkedIn strategy accordingly.

Linkedin has done a pretty good job of making the latest version of the desktop and the mobile app look and function the same, but there are still significant differences that need to be recognized. In order to take advantage of the full array of LinkedIn features, I generally access the desktop version because my tablet defaults to the mobile app.

Last week I wrote about specific strategies for getting your profile on the mobile app in tip-top shape. Now I will address mobile app activity features and other simple strategies that will help you capitalize on LinkedIn when you're on the go.
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Best LinkedIn mobile app strategies and features

Search for specific types of people. Advanced people search has long been one of the most helpful LinkedIn features on the desktop, but on the mobile app—well, not so much. But now things have changed. Although it's not the full advanced people search you might be used to, it's getting better and is definitively worth checking out.

Start by entering a keyword like marketing in the big, white search box on the top of your mobile app. Then select Marketing in People and click the word Filters on the top right.

You can further refine your search for people by connections (1st, 2nd or 3rd), connections of (my personal favorite), locations, current companies, past companies, industries, or schools.

Click the word Done in the top right corner when you're finished selecting your additional search filters. From the search results you can select the profiles you'd like to examine.

The are a lot more search filters on the desktop and you can also save searches, but the mobile app works pretty well when you need to do a quick search in a parking lot or airport.

Personalize your invitation to connect. Just click the three dots below the person's profile photo on your mobile screen and select Personalize invite. Then you have 300 characters to tell the person why it would be helpful for him/her to join your LinkedIn network.

Rather than simply clicking the Connect button on someone's profile, get in the habit of personalizing your invitations—on desktop and mobile—and you'll improve your chances of getting connected to people in your target audience.

Personalized invitations you receive. When you click the My Network icon on the bottom of the mobile home page, the invitations you've received will be displayed at the top of the screen. When you discover an invitation that includes a personalized note, it's usually a good idea to message the person back.

In my experience, when people write me a personalized note, there's a much greater chance that the relationship will bring about a win-win result.

Review your personal notifications. This is a "must click" tab because Linkedin has put in one place all the most important things going on in your network—with no advertising and no information from people you're not connected to. In other words, it's the stuff you want to know about and maybe engage with.

It ranges from important dates (birthdays, work anniversaries and job changes) to who is interacting with the things you've been publishing or engaging with. It's a virtual roadmap to information that could and should lead to a real interaction with someone.

Don't forget to utilize the tagging (@mention) feature for either the individual or their company for more interaction, engagement, and exposure when commenting or sharing information. Just click the "@" and then select the person you want to mention in your update. They will then be notified of your mention, and their name is then hyperlinked to their profile.

Share a status update. From the home page of your mobile app you can easily share and include your personal comments about an article, photo or video. Either copy and paste the article URL from your mobile web browser or directly upload a video or photo. This important LinkedIn function works seamlessly on the mobile app.

Send a direct message. Click the Messaging tab at the bottom of the app, and your LinkedIn inbox will appear, with all inbound and outbound messages in chronological order and looking very similar to the desktop version of your inbox. This function works great and allows you to respond in a timely manner, which is so important in the speed-to-answer world we find ourselves in.

I hope this primer on the best activity features on LinkedIn's mobile app helps you stay connected to your network anytime your mobile device is within reach.
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SPECIAL OFFER

If you’d like help with developing a LinkedIn strategy that will catapult your business and career, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one LinkedIn consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). This offer also includes an in-depth critique of your profile.

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked-up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

 

The post Is the LinkedIn Mobile App Helping You? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Please Take the Time to Do This Important LinkedIn Function

Are you taking enough time to evaluate and respond to your inbound requests to connect on LinkedIn?

I'm guessing probably not.

During the fifty or so one-on-one LinkedIn consultations I've done over the past few months, I learned that most people have a just-get-it-done attitude when it comes to responding to invitations to connect. Well, personal experience has taught me that a thoughtful, personal response will many times open the elusive door to opportunity, and here are some simple ways you can capitalize on these invitations.
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Attitude is everything

Most people who invite you to join their network are hoping to build on a relationship you already have or start a new relationship that will be mutually beneficial.

Granted—there will be spammers or people who do not have your best interests in mind. That's one of social media's unavoidable challenges. But simply click Ignore and get rid of them as fast as you can.

Now, some people won't take the time to explain why they want to connect with you—and others won't even know how to send a personalized note. But if you start with the premise that these people could be referrals from your longtime clients and not simply people who just want to sell you something, it will be easier to spend a few extra minutes considering whether they'll be a good addition to your network.
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How to uncover potential opportunities

Rather than addressing your inbound invitations while you're standing in the grocery checkout line, set aside some time to devote to this task. Then open the entire list by clicking Network in your top toolbar and choosing Manage all. Then evaluate each invitation as follows:

If you know the person well and interact with them often, click the Accept button and, at a minimum, send a message back to thank them for initiating the invitation and express your desire to help each other in the future.

If the person or the company they represent sounds somewhat familiar to you, go directly to their profile and see what information you can gather.
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  • How do they describe themselves in their Headline and Summary?
  • How many connections do they have and how complete is their profile?
  • How many and who are your mutual connections?
  • What responsibility do they have in their current job and where did they work in the past?
  • What are they sharing and writing? (View their Articles and Activity)
  • Where and when did they go to school?
  • What accomplishments do they display?

This information should help clarify whether they would be a good addition to your network.

If you choose to accept them, I challenge you to send a follow-up thank-you message. This simple, kind gesture will be the first step toward growing this relationship into one that will produce results.

It can also be advantageous to offer something of value in your note, like a helpful resource or an invitation to an upcoming event. You can either attach the information or provide a link to it.

Another simple way to add immediate value to this relationship is to introduce them to people in your network who could help them in some way—and hopefully the introduction will be beneficial for both parties.

If you'd like to take it a step further, suggest a follow-up phone call or meeting. I use Calendly, a calendar sharing tool that makes it easy to book an appointment with me.

If neither the person nor the company they represent is familiar to you, don't hastily click Ignore but instead follow the same vetting steps mentioned above. You may just find some gold in them thar hills.

They took the time to send you an invitation and undoubtedly have a reason for wanting you to join their network. If you'd like to uncover the reason, you can send them a message before accepting the invitation by clicking Message below their entry on the Manage Invitations page.

Spend the extra time, and soon those relationships will bring new opportunities you would have missed if you had hurried through your inbound invitations.
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SPECIAL OFFER

For more simple strategies to improve your LinkedIn ROI, along with a detailed critique of your profile, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one phone consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). 

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

The post Please Take the Time to Do This Important LinkedIn Function appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Trust Me, You’ll Love This New LinkedIn Feature

Great news!

Cheerful smiling young man with tabletSearching through one of your LinkedIn connection's network to find a certain type of person just got much easier—and this applies to you whether you have a free account or you're paying to use LinkedIn.

If you're like me, you really appreciate receiving referrals from people in your network, but it's not easy to ask the open-ended question,"Who in your network could help me find a job, customer, etc.?"

And rather than putting all the pressure on your connection to come up with the right people, why not use LinkedIn's newest feature to find the right people all by yourself.
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How to search your connection's network

Follow these simple steps, and you'll quickly discover who might be able to help you achieve your goal.

Put your cursor in the big, white search box in the top toolbar and select Screen Shot 2017-07-03 at 2.31.52 PMSearch for people with filters from the drop-down menu.

On the right side of your screen, under Filter people by, go to the Connections of box and type in your connection's name. When his/her name appears in the drop-down menu, click that entry.

Then use any of the other available filters to narrow the search to people at the right company, location, school attended, title, etc.

Review the list that LinkedIn provides for you. If you find people who look interesting to you, check out their profile, and then ask your connection how best to approach the people (through a LinkedIn connection request, phone call, email, in-person meeting, etc.)

Screen Shot 2017-08-16 at 11.42.42 AMCaveat: If your connection has chosen to hide his/her first-level network from his connections, you'll only be able to see people to whom both of you are connected.  

Here's an example of how my search filters would look if I wanted to find out whether my connection Bob Hill knows any presidents or CEOs in the marketing and advertising industry in the Milwaukee area.

I know you'll be as excited as I was to see that LinkedIn has brought back this feature, and your network will appreciate the homework you do before asking for a referral.

If you'd like me to show you other hard-to-find, "can't miss" LinkedIn features, help you formulate your personal LinkedIn strategy, plus provide an in-depth critique of your LinkedIn profile, sign up for a one-hour, one-on-one consultation with me for the significantly reduced rate of $175. (This is a limited-time offer.)

Book your personal session today at https://calendly.com/waynebreitbarth/special1on1linkedinconsult.

The post Trust Me, You’ll Love This New LinkedIn Feature appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Do You Look Like an Expert on LinkedIn or Just a Bragger?

A few years back my mom said, I thought I taught you that bragging is not nice! I Screen Shot 2017-08-04 at 4.48.22 PMlooked at your LinkedIn thing, and you're tooting your horn all over the place.

Well, there definitely is a fine line between being real and authentic on your LinkedIn profile and appearing boastful or pretentious. However, it's extremely important to clearly show people why you are expert at what you do and share valuable information with your network.

As a guy who looks at probably a hundred profiles each week, I can definitively tell you that most people are not displaying and sharing enough information, and this puts them at a distinct disadvantage when someone is comparing them to others in the same or similar position.

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Best ways to use LinkedIn to display and share your expertise

If you need to beef up your profile and boost your presence on LinkedIn, here are seven simple ways to accomplish that without getting scolded by your mom.

1.  Recommendations. It does take time to secure recommendations, but it will be worth the effort, because nothing is better than someone else saying you're the best. It will differentiate you from others when people are comparing you to your competitors, and you'll undoubtedly receive lots of positive comments about the quality of your recommendations—which should lead to new business.

2.  Skills and related endorsements. Even though this feature has caused a lot of confusion (and rightly so), it still has great value. You can display what you're expert at, and, if done correctly, it will help you get to the top of the list when people are looking for your products, services, and expertise.

Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.19.58 AM3.  Adding media (available in the Summary, Experience and Education sections of your profile). These are great places to display or link to documents (Word, Excel and pdf), video, Power Point presentations, blog entries, and photos that allow the readers to see for themselves the depth of your expertise.

4. Separate job experience entry for industry leadership position. If you hold or have held an office or position in an industry related association or organization, highlight that fact by adding an additional current or past job experience entry to your profile. Share specific details about your responsibilities. Also, if you're a speaker at your association's events or a contributor to their newsletter or blog, share that as well.

Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.21.43 AM5.  Accomplishments profile sections. Don't be bashful about adding these special profile sections and including details related to each entry. Remember—you're the only one who is going to tell your story. Also, if you don't list any accomplishments on your profile, people may assume you don't have any accomplishments!

6.  Individual status updates. Because everyone in your network will not receive or read every status update you post, share your best resources regularly. This also gives Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 10.24.10 AMpeople who are new to your network an opportunity to see your best stuff.

7.  Publish an article. This is the newest way to share your thought leadership. It's like having your own blog, and your network is notified whenever you post an article. And because it stays on your profile, people will see your expertise on display whenever they visit your profile.

Don't let your competitors get an advantage over you on LinkedIn. Be real and authentic as you proudly display who you are and what you have to offer—and hopefully your mom will say, That's my awesome kid!

The post Do You Look Like an Expert on LinkedIn or Just a Bragger? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Are You Still Confused by LinkedIn Skills and Endorsements?

Happy 5th birthday, LinkedIn Skills!

Birthday cakeYes, it has been five years since LinkedIn Skills appeared on your profile and probably caused a bit of confusion for you. Then a few years later the confusion ramped up when endorsements started showing up alongside your skills. And because LinkedIn started asking its members to endorse their connections, people began endorsing others for everything and anything—even skills we never added to our profile.

And just when most of us started to understand and take control of this profile section, LinkedIn gave us a five-year "birthday present" as part of the new desktop layout—an updated profile section titled Featured Skills & Endorsements and what they call "skill endorsements." And I thought birthday parties were supposed to be fun!
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How to optimize your Featured Skills & Endorsements profile section

Let's raise the fun factor just a bit with these nine facts and tips to maximize your use of this new profile section.

1.  You can only receive endorsements from 1st level connections and for skills you have acknowledged you possess. If you receive Screen Shot 2017-05-10 at 2.31.40 PMa pending endorsement notification from LinkedIn saying, John Jones wants to endorse you for basket weaving, don't say yes if you aren't a good basket weaver or don't want basket weaving listed as a skill in your Featured Skills & Endorsements section.

2.  You can manage them to a certain extent. Scroll down to the Featured Skills & Endorsements section of your profile, and then you can:
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  • Add any skills that show what you're good at from a professional standpoint. If your job duties include sales, add keywords that relate to the products and services you sell. After you click Add a new skill, type a skill in the box. LinkedIn will then give you suggestions based on the words you put in the box. If those suggestions are part of your skill set, be sure to add them to your list of skills.
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  • Screen Shot 2017-05-10 at 2.33.26 PMDelete a skill. Click the pencil icon in the top right corner. Then click the "X" to the left of the skill you want to delete, and it's gone—along with any endorsements of that skill, of course.
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  • Reorder your skills so your most important ones are near the top. These are your best keywords, and they'll improve your search ranking. Put them in the order you prefer, from most important to least important, by clicking the pencil icon and then holding down and dragging the four-line icon to the right of the skill you want to reorder.
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    Then your connections will be encouraged to tick off endorsements for the skills you think are important, and within a short period of time they'll be the most endorsed skills on your profile. This will help you get closer to the top of a search for those critical skills.
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    The reordering process is especially important now because only the first three skills (LinkedIn refers to them as "featured") and the related endorsements show up until the reader clicks View XX more.
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  • Choose (1) whether or not you want to be endorsed, (2) whether you want LinkedIn to suggest endorsements to your connections, and (3) whether you want suggestions for endorsing your connections. Click Adjust endorsement settings on the bottom of the page to revise your settings.

3.  You can be endorsed for up to 50 skills. These skills are essentially keywords, and LinkedIn and other search engines love keywords; so I would use all 50 slots if I were you.

4.  You don't have to endorse everyone who endorses you. If you want to endorse them, go ahead, but don't feel obligated to do so.

5.  I'm pretty sure endorsements and the skills they attach to are part of the LinkedIn search algorithm. LinkedIn doesn't publicize its algorithm, but my guess is that skills are an important part of it, because LinkedIn doesn't invest this much time and effort into something that isn't going to help their top line revenue. They are making a lot of money on their Recruiting Solutions, and they obviously think this feature helps them deliver the "best" candidate for a certain skill ("best" meaning most endorsed).

6.  List skills that are important and consistent with your current or future business strategy. Because your skills that receive the most endorsements will be at the top of the list—and most people will probably only look at the first few skills—you want them to be your most important skills. If you list extraneous skills, you may get a lot of endorsements for them, and then no one will even notice your most important skills that are now further down on the list.

7.  You might get someone's attention if you endorse him/her. Your face and name will appear on the person's profile, and LinkedIn also sends the person a message saying you just endorsed him/her.

8.  Endorsements may be the differentiator. If two profiles look similar in all respects but one has 120 endorsements for the skill you're looking for and the other has only 20, you may be inclined to choose the person with 120.

9.  Endorsements are great, but LinkedIn recommendations are still important. I recommend you get at least two recommendations on your profile. This is especially important if you're a job seeker. Great recommendations will increase your credibility—and the more the better.

You should now be ready to impress readers of your profile with your specific skills and affirmation of those skills by LinkedIn members.

If you'd like more information about this topic, check out LinkedIn's complete discussion in the LinkedIn Help Center by clicking here.

The post Are You Still Confused by LinkedIn Skills and Endorsements? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How to Discover if You’re Really a LinkedIn All-Star

A pin being used to pop a green balloonCongratulations! You're an All-Star.

If you received this message from LinkedIn, well, I hate to burst your balloon, but an All-Star profile rating has very little to do with how successful you'll be on LinkedIn. And because of the significant profile changes that are part of the new desktop redesign, you need to rethink many of the profile strategies that have worked in the past.
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Be sure to check out my special, limited time offer below for 50% off a one-hour LinkedIn consultation that includes an in-depth profile critique.
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In my opinion, to have a truly exceptional LinkedIn profile that will help you accomplish your most ambitious business goals, you need to embrace these two important strategies:
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  • Capitalize on the LinkedIn search algorithm in order to come up higher in the search results
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  • Provide a very clear description of what you do, who you help, and why you are better than your competition

Each and every entry you make on your profile should be made with those two strategies in mind.


Simple ways to create an extraordinary LinkedIn profile

When I work with my individual and corporate clients to create LinkedIn profiles that get results, I focus on the following features and techniques:

Keywords. Include your most important keywords throughout your profile but especially in these three sections: Headline, Job Experience Titles, and Skills. This will significantly improve your placement in search results.

Headline. Make sure your Headline grabs your reader's attention and encourages him/her to read more.

First Job Experience entry. With the new profile layout, your first Current Job Experience entry is completely visible and doesn't require the reader to click See Description to view the details. This is your opportunity to make sure the reader gets a full picture of what you and your company do, the types of clients or customers you serve, and what makes you better than your competitors. Only the job title and company name are visible for all other Job Experience entries.

There are 2,000 available characters for each Job Experience entry, and you can also add media. So don't hesitate to "show and tell" the world why you're the best at what you do.

Other Job Experience entries. With the new profile layout, all the details of your other Job Experience entries are hidden, requiring the reader to click See Description to view any of the details you've outlined. Therefore, I highly recommend that you expand your Job Title entries. Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 8.13.40 AMThere is a 100-character limit, but that's ample space to give the reader a preview of what specific things you did in each job.

As an added bonus, any words you add to your Job Experience titles seem to have increased weighting in the search algorithm, thereby helping you move up on the list while improving the clarity of your story.

Recommendations. Two recommendations are given a very prominent position on your new profile, so work hard on getting a couple that really highlight your strengths and differentiate you from your competitors.

Remember—this is the only part of your profile that other people contribute, and readers will appreciate hearing about you and the great work you do from the perspective of others.

Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 4.07.18 PMAccomplishments. This one is simple—if you don't have anything listed in your Accomplishments sections, it looks like you didn't accomplish anything.

Subsections of the Accomplishments section include Honors and Awards, Test Scores, Publications, Projects, Certifications, Organizations, Languages, Courses, and Patents. Include any appropriate subsections and provide details that will inform readers of your unique and important accomplishments.

Contact Info. Add business-related contact information if you feel it's important for Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 8.18.12 AMreaders to get ahold of you without sending you a LinkedIn connection request. I recommend you include contact information in the beginning of your Summary and in your current Job Experience entry.

Once you complete these specific steps, I'm confident you'll stand out from the other players on the field, and you may just earn a spot on the real all-star team—the team that gets all the new business, secures the perfect jobs, and has the most effective relationships. Good luck!

Special Offer

If you'd like me to provide a detailed critique of your profile and help you develop a winning LinkedIn strategy, be sure to take advantage of my May special offer: A one-hour, one-on-one consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee).

This consultation will take place on the phone, and I will share my computer screen with you. There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book yours today by clicking here.

The post How to Discover if You’re Really a LinkedIn All-Star appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Create a Targeted Prospect List on the New LinkedIn in 5 Minutes or Less

Do you know that in five minutes the new LinkedIn can help you fill a virtual room with stopwatch time iconyour perfect prospects and then add new prospects each week?

And once you find them, their LinkedIn profiles will help you figure out the best way to meet them.

To quickly get your highly targeted prospect list, just follow these simple steps.

Let's say you want to find the current managers of purchasing, procurement, etc. at three of the largest manufacturers in Milwaukee: Generac, Rockwell Automation, and SC Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.53.50 PMJohnson.

1.  Enter manager + (purchasing OR procurement OR "supply chain" OR buyer) in the Search box on the left side of your top toolbar. Then click the magnifying glass next to the Search box.

2.  When the results are returned, click People from the choices on the line just below the top toolbar.Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.52.32 PM

3.  In the right-hand filter column, click the +Add icon in the Locations- section and type Milwaukee. Then choose Greater Milwaukee.

4.  Next, in the right-hand filter column, click +Add in the Current Companies section. Then type Generac and choose the Generac company entry that you're interested in. Repeat for Rockwell and SC Johnson.

You'll then see a list of your perfect prospects at those three companies on your screen. And if you click Create Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 1.53.05 PMsearch alert near the bottom of the right filter column, you'll get a weekly email from LinkedIn with any new prospects at those three companies.

For the people on this list, you can:
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  • Check out their full profiles and see who in your network can introduce you to them.
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  • Look for conversation starters; e.g., similar interests, previous employers, schools attended, LinkedIn groups, community service involvement, etc.
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  • Send a direct LinkedIn message if you and your prospect are both members of the same LinkedIn group. If you have no similar groups, consider joining one of your prospect's groups so you can send a free direct message.
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  • Send a customized LinkedIn connection invitation that includes information about how you might be able to help them.

No more cold calling and saying, May I speak with the purchasing manager, please. At a minimum, you'll have the name of your prospect. But if you use your LinkedIn resources well, you'll have a wealth of information about your prospect and perhaps even a personal introduction.

The post Create a Targeted Prospect List on the New LinkedIn in 5 Minutes or Less appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.