Here is How LinkedIn Can Turn Your Waiting Time to Money Time

Picture yourself a few minutes early for an appointment with a client or someone who might be able to help you get a great new job. You're sitting in your car or hanging out in their lobby or waiting room. 

What is the highest and best use of that few minutes prior to your meeting?

I suggest it's using LinkedIn's free and recently improved mobile app to check out the network of the person you're meeting and look for people you'd like to get introduced to.

Here's how it works.

Open your LinkedIn mobile app.

Type in the search box the title(s) of the people you're most interested in finding. If you have multiple titles, you need to put an OR in between the titles, and the OR needs to be in all caps.

Once you receive your search results, choose People and then Filters.

Choose the Connections of filter option, and enter the name of the person you're waiting to meet in the search box that appears.

Caveat: To do this, you have to be connected to the person you're going to be meeting with.

Next, click the big, blue Apply button at the bottom of your screen, and LinkedIn will give you a list of that person's connections who have the title you requested.

You can also go back to Filters and add additional filters to your existing search, including location, current companies, past companies, industries or schools.

Caveat: If your connection has chosen to hide their first-level network from their connections, you'll only be able to see people to whom both of you are connected.

Scroll through the list and look for two or three of the most interesting people. Then mention those people at your upcoming meeting, and see if they'd be willing to introduce you to them.

This is like flipping through the person's Rolodex (I'm dating myself), Outlook, or wherever they keep track of their friends prior to your meeting. I'm sure I don't need to tell you just how valuable this could be.

So stop wasting time while waiting for people. Pull up your LinkedIn mobile app and start searching for people who can help you move your business and career forward.

You can find instructions for doing the same LinkedIn function on your desktop in this companion article.

SPECIAL OFFER: If you'd like to learn more valuable strategies and how you can implement them to grow your specific business, then take advantage of the $175 special I'm running.

In addition to my detailed critique of your profile, I'll spend a full hour on the phone with you and share my computer screen. We'll focus on your business and career goals and discuss how to spend your time effectively on LinkedIn. Click here to book your slot.

Here's what a recent client said about her session:

"I highly recommend Wayne's 1:1 LinkedIn coaching session. Per Wayne's guidance, I reached out to the SVP of Client Success for a company I saw a suitable role. I used language Wayne provided in our 1:1 session to initiate the contact. The SVP responded within an hour, stating they are looking for someone in the Chicago market, that he liked my background, and that I should email him once I apply so he could ask the recruiter to reach out to me. Since then I've had an initial interview and interacted with the SVP multiple times, adding a valuable contact to my network. Wayne, thanks for giving me the tools I needed to move a little further outside my comfort zone and amp up my networking."

Get your slot booked with me now by clicking here. I have a limited amount of these slots at the $175 special price.

The post Here is How LinkedIn Can Turn Your Waiting Time to Money Time appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Here is How LinkedIn Can Turn Your Waiting Time to Money Time

Picture yourself a few minutes early for an appointment with a client or someone who might be able to help you get a great new job. You're sitting in your car or hanging out in their lobby or waiting room. 

What is the highest and best use of that few minutes prior to your meeting?

I suggest it's using LinkedIn's free and recently improved mobile app to check out the network of the person you're meeting and look for people you'd like to get introduced to.

Here's how it works.

Open your LinkedIn mobile app.

Type in the search box the title(s) of the people you're most interested in finding. If you have multiple titles, you need to put an OR in between the titles, and the OR needs to be in all caps.

Once you receive your search results, choose People and then Filters.

Choose the Connections of filter option, and enter the name of the person you're waiting to meet in the search box that appears.

Caveat: To do this, you have to be connected to the person you're going to be meeting with.

Next, click the big, blue Apply button at the bottom of your screen, and LinkedIn will give you a list of that person's connections who have the title you requested.

You can also go back to Filters and add additional filters to your existing search, including location, current companies, past companies, industries or schools.

Caveat: If your connection has chosen to hide their first-level network from their connections, you'll only be able to see people to whom both of you are connected.

Scroll through the list and look for two or three of the most interesting people. Then mention those people at your upcoming meeting, and see if they'd be willing to introduce you to them.

This is like flipping through the person's Rolodex (I'm dating myself), Outlook, or wherever they keep track of their friends prior to your meeting. I'm sure I don't need to tell you just how valuable this could be.

So stop wasting time while waiting for people. Pull up your LinkedIn mobile app and start searching for people who can help you move your business and career forward.

You can find instructions for doing the same LinkedIn function on your desktop in this companion article.

SPECIAL OFFER: If you'd like to learn more valuable strategies and how you can implement them to grow your specific business, then take advantage of the $175 special I'm running.

In addition to my detailed critique of your profile, I'll spend a full hour on the phone with you and share my computer screen. We'll focus on your business and career goals and discuss how to spend your time effectively on LinkedIn. Click here to book your slot.

Here's what a recent client said about her session:

"I highly recommend Wayne's 1:1 LinkedIn coaching session. Per Wayne's guidance, I reached out to the SVP of Client Success for a company I saw a suitable role. I used language Wayne provided in our 1:1 session to initiate the contact. The SVP responded within an hour, stating they are looking for someone in the Chicago market, that he liked my background, and that I should email him once I apply so he could ask the recruiter to reach out to me. Since then I've had an initial interview and interacted with the SVP multiple times, adding a valuable contact to my network. Wayne, thanks for giving me the tools I needed to move a little further outside my comfort zone and amp up my networking."

Get your slot booked with me now by clicking here. I have a limited amount of these slots at the $175 special price.

The post Here is How LinkedIn Can Turn Your Waiting Time to Money Time appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

Is the LinkedIn Mobile App Helping You?

Because at most times you're probably closer to your mobile device than your desktop, it's important to understand the limitations and opportunities on the LinkedIn mobile app and adjust your LinkedIn strategy accordingly.

Linkedin has done a pretty good job of making the latest version of the desktop and the mobile app look and function the same, but there are still significant differences that need to be recognized. In order to take advantage of the full array of LinkedIn features, I generally access the desktop version because my tablet defaults to the mobile app.

Last week I wrote about specific strategies for getting your profile on the mobile app in tip-top shape. Now I will address mobile app activity features and other simple strategies that will help you capitalize on LinkedIn when you're on the go.
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Best LinkedIn mobile app strategies and features

Search for specific types of people. Advanced people search has long been one of the most helpful LinkedIn features on the desktop, but on the mobile app—well, not so much. But now things have changed. Although it's not the full advanced people search you might be used to, it's getting better and is definitively worth checking out.

Start by entering a keyword like marketing in the big, white search box on the top of your mobile app. Then select Marketing in People and click the word Filters on the top right.

You can further refine your search for people by connections (1st, 2nd or 3rd), connections of (my personal favorite), locations, current companies, past companies, industries, or schools.

Click the word Done in the top right corner when you're finished selecting your additional search filters. From the search results you can select the profiles you'd like to examine.

The are a lot more search filters on the desktop and you can also save searches, but the mobile app works pretty well when you need to do a quick search in a parking lot or airport.

Personalize your invitation to connect. Just click the three dots below the person's profile photo on your mobile screen and select Personalize invite. Then you have 300 characters to tell the person why it would be helpful for him/her to join your LinkedIn network.

Rather than simply clicking the Connect button on someone's profile, get in the habit of personalizing your invitations—on desktop and mobile—and you'll improve your chances of getting connected to people in your target audience.

Personalized invitations you receive. When you click the My Network icon on the bottom of the mobile home page, the invitations you've received will be displayed at the top of the screen. When you discover an invitation that includes a personalized note, it's usually a good idea to message the person back.

In my experience, when people write me a personalized note, there's a much greater chance that the relationship will bring about a win-win result.

Review your personal notifications. This is a "must click" tab because Linkedin has put in one place all the most important things going on in your network—with no advertising and no information from people you're not connected to. In other words, it's the stuff you want to know about and maybe engage with.

It ranges from important dates (birthdays, work anniversaries and job changes) to who is interacting with the things you've been publishing or engaging with. It's a virtual roadmap to information that could and should lead to a real interaction with someone.

Don't forget to utilize the tagging (@mention) feature for either the individual or their company for more interaction, engagement, and exposure when commenting or sharing information. Just click the "@" and then select the person you want to mention in your update. They will then be notified of your mention, and their name is then hyperlinked to their profile.

Share a status update. From the home page of your mobile app you can easily share and include your personal comments about an article, photo or video. Either copy and paste the article URL from your mobile web browser or directly upload a video or photo. This important LinkedIn function works seamlessly on the mobile app.

Send a direct message. Click the Messaging tab at the bottom of the app, and your LinkedIn inbox will appear, with all inbound and outbound messages in chronological order and looking very similar to the desktop version of your inbox. This function works great and allows you to respond in a timely manner, which is so important in the speed-to-answer world we find ourselves in.

I hope this primer on the best activity features on LinkedIn's mobile app helps you stay connected to your network anytime your mobile device is within reach.
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SPECIAL OFFER

If you’d like help with developing a LinkedIn strategy that will catapult your business and career, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one LinkedIn consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). This offer also includes an in-depth critique of your profile.

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked-up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

 

The post Is the LinkedIn Mobile App Helping You? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How Do You Look on the LinkedIn Mobile App?

Over half of all LinkedIn usage is on the LinkedIn mobile app, and we all know in which direction that statistic is going, don't we.

So, is your LinkedIn profile ready for people to view using the app?

Obviously, there are differences in the amount of information that LinkedIn can display on a desktop versus a mobile device, and that difference requires each of us to relook at how we have our profile set up. Obviously, we want to look our best regardless of what device people are using.

Therefore, here are my very best tips for making sure your profile really pops when people are checking you out on the go.
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Mobile App LinkedIn Profile Best Practices

Please keep in mind that many of the revisions outlined below need to be made from your desktop rather than your mobile device.

Headline.  Nothing shows up more prominently than this section, so make sure it clearly displays who you are and what you do.

If you have loaded this information via your desktop, this section is limited to 120 characters. However, if you enter this information via the mobile app, you just might get to include an additional 100 characters. I said "might" because I have heard from a few folks that they could not add the extra characters using their mobile app, but most people have had success.

Education.  Because only your first education entry shows up, it's important to display your best entry. It's still smart to put on your profile the one-day specialty training course you attended last year, but that's probably not the first thing you want viewers to see.

Summary.  On the mobile app, people will see the first 78 characters (including spaces) from your profile summary. This shows up right below your location, so it's important to take full advantage of those characters. I've seen some sales professionals include their phone number and business email here so viewers don't have to struggle to find that information.

Posts.  Published posts get high priority on the mobile app. One post is visible until a viewer chooses to view more. Therefore, you'll want to have at least one post that includes an eye-catching image.

Activity.  The mobile app displays your last two status updates. Don't miss this opportunity to increase your credibility with the LinkedIn communityespecially if your competitors are consistently sharing helpful information.

Job Titles.  LinkedIn does not truncate your job titles on mobile, so you'll want to take full advantage of your 100 characters. And by including a few descriptive words after your formal job title, readers will understand exactly what you can do for themand it will also improve where you appear in the LinkedIn search rankings.

Skills & Endorsements.  The three skills that you have "pinned" to the top of your profile will be displayed on your mobile profile as "Featured." Therefore, make sure they are your most important skills—which are probably also your most relevant keywords. This "pinning" process can only be accomplished on the desktop.

Recommendations.  On mobile, LinkedIn highlights one of your recommendationsand usually only the first part of your most recently received recommendation. If that information is not as flattering as you would like, you can ask that person to revise his/her recommendation, hide that recommendation if the next most recent is better, or try to get a brand new one that really pops.

Accomplishments.  This mobile section displays the raw number of publications, courses and certifications from the corresponding sections on your LinkedIn profile. Therefore, if you have published material, taken courses or received certifications, be sure to flaunt them on your profile, and you'll receive the added benefit of having these numbers show up on mobile.

People Also Viewed.  This is the final section of your mobile profile, and LinkedIn has given it lots of space and even a color of its own for added emphasis. But it's important to decide whether you really want this emphasis. People Also Viewed is an optional section on your LinkedIn profile, but it is automatically included unless you go to Settings and choose to eliminate it. Some people see it as a roadmap to their competitors. Only you can decide if it's helping or hurting you.
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SPECIAL OFFER

If you’d like help with developing a LinkedIn strategy that will catapult your business and career, take advantage of my limited time offer: a one-hour, one-on-one LinkedIn consultation for just $175 (50% off my regular fee). This offer also includes an in-depth critique of your profile.

I will share my computer screen with you during the call and send you a marked-up copy of your profile prior to the call.

There are limited spots available, so don't delay. Book your session today by clicking here.

The post How Do You Look on the LinkedIn Mobile App? appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

LinkedIn Hides Some of the Best Mobile Features

iStock_000017395826_SmallLinkedIn is spending a lot of time and effort on improving the mobile user's experienceand the more I experiment with the LinkedIn mobile app, the more capabilities I stumble upon.
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Five helpful LinkedIn mobile app features

Here are some of the coolest capabilities I've foundthough they are somewhat hard to findand some are not even available on your desktop.

Personalize your invitation to connect. Just click the three small dots on the top right of your mobile screen when viewing someone's profile and select Personalize invite. Then you have 300 characters to tell the person why it would be helpful for him/her to join your LinkedIn network. Diligently personalizing your invitations on desktop or mobile will improve your chances for getting connected to people in your target audience.

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-6-04-45-pmPersonalized invitations you receive. When people take the time to write you a personalized note with their invitation to connect, it typically should encourage you to message them back. These messages have been a bit hard to find on the desktop (read this article for help), but on the mobile app it's pretty easy once you find the right screen.

Click the My Network icon on the bottom of the mobile home page, and the invitations you've received will be displayed at the top of the screen. These personalized notes tend to be golden nuggets for me, so I make this an important part of my LinkedIn routine.

Analytical data on articles you share or publish. LinkedIn has historically been very stingy when it comes to sharing analytics, but as of now you can get some pretty cool data on the articles you're sharing and/or the ones you publish yourselfbut only on the mobile app.

Just click the Notifications icon on the bottom of the mobile app and scroll through highlights of your activity. When See article analytics or See post analytics is displayed, click it for a pretty deep dive into some helpful composite analytics on the type of people who are viewing that update and also suggestions for other similar articles you may want to share.

Don't miss the other great insights (See new positions, See who's celebrating, etc.) that LinkedIn has shared with you in this section on your mobile app.

screen-shot-2016-11-10-at-11-00-40-amReconnect with people already in your network. At least once a week LinkedIn will share with you ideas for reaching out to a few people in your network who have LinkedIn activity that you may want to message them about. This is a very helpful feature that I encourage you to check out, but it has a couple frustrating limitations relating to when it's available and who LinkedIn picks for you to reconnect with.

After selecting the Messaging icon on the bottom of your mobile app, Reconnect with your network should appear at the top. Click the Take a Look box, and then pick one of the people LinkedIn has suggested. It will then suggest action steps you may want to take to reconnect with that person.

Search for specific types of people. Advanced people search has long been one of the most helpful LinkedIn features on the desktop, but on the mobile appwell, not so much. Well, things have changed, and although it's not the full advanced people search you might be used to, it's getting better and is definitively worth checking out.

Start by entering a keyword like marketing in the big white search box on the top of your mobile app. Thenscreen-shot-2016-11-12-at-5-57-15-pm select People with the skills-Marketing and click the back-and-forth arrow on the top right.

You can further refine your search for people by connection level (1st, 2nd or 3rd), location, current company or industries. Click the word Done in the top right corner when you're finished selecting your additional search filters. From the search results you can select the profiles you'd like to examine.

I know you'll want some of these features to become part of your LinkedIn routine; so spend time getting proficient with them. Then keep your eyes openyou just never know when you'll stumble upon others. And when you do, be sure to let me know about them!

The post LinkedIn Hides Some of the Best Mobile Features appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Mobile (Part 2)

Last week I addressed seven simple ways to tweak your LinkedIn profile to give it a more professional appearance on the mobile app–iStock_000024725062_Smalland also improve the likelihood that viewers will engage with you.

Let me remind you again that you can do some editing on the mobile site, but I suggest you make changes to your profile on the LinkedIn site rather than on the app. However, wherever you choose to make changes, be sure to check how your changes appear on the LinkedIn site and the mobile app.
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More ways to get your mobile house in order

It will take a few minutes to make these tweaks, but it will be time well spent since more than 50 percent of LinkedIn members are now using the mobile app.

Job Titles.  LinkedIn does not truncate your job titles on mobile, so you’ll want to take full advantage of your 100 characters. And by including Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 3.44.08 PMa few descriptive words after your formal job title, readers will understand exactly what you can do for them–and it will also improve where you appear in the LinkedIn search rankings.

Volunteering.  Because this optional profile section appears on mobile, be sure to highlight any nonprofit organizations with which you’re involved.

Skills & Endorsements.  The top four skills you’ve listed on your regular profile will be displayed on your mobile profile. Therefore, make sure IMG_0880they are your most important skills (a/k/a keywords). As you may have noticed, this section seems to have a mind of its own, but you can add additional skills and rearrange the skills in the order you prefer.

Recommendations.  On mobile, LinkedIn highlights one of your recommendations–and usually only the first part of that recommendation. I can’t figure out how they choose which one to display, but if the one that shows up on your mobile profile isn’t as flattering as you’d like it to be, I suggest you ask the writer to revise his/her recommendation. In the alternative, you may wish to hide that recommendation. Then, if you’re lucky, LinkedIn might display one of your more impactful recommendations on mobile.

Accomplishments.  This mobile section displays the raw number of publications, courses and certifications from the corresponding Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 3.37.31 PMsections on your LinkedIn profile. Therefore, if you have published material, taken courses or received certifications, be sure to flaunt them on your profile, and you’ll receive the added benefit of having these numbers show up on mobile.

People Also Viewed.  This is the final section of your mobile profile, and LinkedIn has given it lots of space and even a color of its own for added emphasis. But it’s important to decide whether you really want this emphasis.

People Also Viewed is an optional section on your LinkedIn profile, IMG_0882but it is automatically included unless you go to Settings and choose to eliminate it. Some people see it as a roadmap to their competitors. Only you can decide if it’s helping or hurting you.

To learn more, read LinkedIn’s People Also Viewed: How to Make it Work for You.

There you have it–all the steps you need to take to ensure that your professional brand is being displayed clearly and correctly on LinkedIn’s mobile site.

The post How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Mobile (Part 2) appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.

How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Mobile (Part 1)

Have you checked what your LinkedIn profile looks like on the new LinkedIn mobile app?

iStock_000017395826_SmallIf you haven’t, you may be surprised when you see what information LinkedIn has decided to highlight, truncate or eliminate altogether. With over 50 percent of LinkedIn members now using the mobile app, you could be missing the boat when it comes to promoting your professional brand.
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How to get your mobile house in order

Here are some of the simple steps you can take to put your best foot forward with mobile users. I will have more helpful hints for you next week.

I suggest making changes to your profile on the LinkedIn site versus on the app–but it is possible to do some editing on the mobile site. However, wherever you choose to make changes, be sure to check how your changes appear on the LinkedIn site and the mobile app.

Photo.  If you don’t have a photo on your profile, most people will wonder if you even use your LinkedIn account. If you want to be taken IMG_0883seriously, use a professional quality photo. And beware–if the resolution is not high enough, your photo won’t fill the circle, and you’ll look like an amateur.

Banner.  The banner image is quite a bit smaller on the mobile app, and only part of your full banner is visible. You only get one chance to make a first impression. Configure your profile banner so it looks impressive on the LinkedIn site as well as the mobile app.

Headline.  This gets truncated to just 58 characters (including spaces) on mobile. Thus, you’ll obviously want those 58 characters to display a clear statement of who you are and what you do.

Education.  Because only your first education entry shows up, it’s important to display your best entry. It’s still smart to put on your profile the one-day specialty training course you attended last year, but that’s not the first thing you want viewers to see.

Summary.  On the mobile app, people will see the first 78 characters (including spaces) from your profile summary. This shows up right below your location, so it’s important to take full advantage of those characters. I’ve seen some sales professionals include their phone number and business email here so viewers don’t have to struggle to IMG_0878find that information.

Posts.  Published posts get high priority on the mobile app. One post is visible until a viewer chooses to view more. Therefore, you’ll want to have at least one post that includes an eye-catching image.

Activity.  The mobile app displays your last two status updates. Don’t miss this opportunity to increase your credibility with the LinkedIn community–especially if your competitors are consistently sharing helpful information.

Spend some time this week getting these areas of your mobile house in order, and next week I’ll show you how you can improve six more areas of your mobile profile.

The post How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Mobile (Part 1) appeared first on Wayne Breitbarth.